Sickle cell can cut lives short

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Sickle cell can cut lives short

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Sickle cells are when you don’t have enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen  through your body. Sickle cells are shaped like sickle or a crescent moon and normal blood cells are flexible, round, and moving around your body. With sickle cells, your blood cells become rigid and sticky. These irregular shaped cells can get stuck in your small blood vessels which can slow or block blood flow and oxygen to parts of the body. There is no cure for most people with sickle cell  but treatments can relieve pain and help prevent problems associated with the disease. The signs or symptoms of sickle cells are, anemia which is when sickle cells break apart and dies easily leaving you without enough regular red blood cells and red blood cells usually live up to 120 days and then need to be replaced. But sickle cells live up to 10 to 20 days leaving a short amount of regular blood cells. Another sign is episodes of pain and since the sickle cells get stuck between the small vessels.

Not only can sickle cell block breathing but it could cause a lot of pain and it could also harm organs, muscles, and bones. Around 100,000 americans are living with sickle cell, sickle cells affect millions of people worldwide but it’s more common in Africa, Mediterranean countries like Greece, Turkey, and Italy and it’s also common in the spanish speaking regions like in South America, Central America and parts of the Caribbean. One in 12 African Americans carry the sickle cell. If a parent has sickle cell anemia, there may be a 50% possibility that it can inherit it to their children. Eighteen percent of the deaths occured in a patient with overt organ failure. Approximately 100,000 people suffer from sickle cell anemia, and two million people have sickle cell trait.

Sickle cell anemia can be a very painful disease and cause a slow death. If you start to feel all these symptoms then you probably have sickle cell anemia. Males live up to 60 years and females live up to 68 years, if they have sickle cells. Sometimes sickle cell anemia can get so bad that males die at the age of 42, and females live up to the age of 48. People with sickle cell trait don’t have any symptoms, and live a normal life. If you start to feel any of these symptoms like breathing problems, pain in your body, or organ failures, then you should probably see a doctor to check if your a sickle cell victim.